Monday, March 27, 2006

SEMINAR PROGRAMME

There are several Australian talks at the upcoming Oxford Kobe seminar on endangered languages.

Link goes to programme.

Sunday, March 26, 2006

Australian Journal of Linguistics

Volume 26/1 of AJL is devoted to issues in Australian languages.

Table of contents:

Spearing the Emu Drinking: Subordination and the Adjoined Relative Clause in Wambaya*
pp. 5-29(25)
Author: Nordlinger, Rachel

Who Said Polysynthetic Languages Avoid Subordination? Multiple Subordination Strategies in Dalabon*
pp. 31-58(28)
Author: Evans, Nicholas

The Nature of Irreality in the Past Domain: Evidence from Past Intentional Constructions in Australian Languages*
pp. 59-79(21)
Author: Verstraete, Jean-Christophe

Case Marking Strategies in Subordinate Clauses in Pilbara Languages—Some Diachronic Speculations*
pp. 81-105(25)
Author: Dench, Alan

Grammaticalization of Demonstratives as Subordinate Complementizers in Ngumpin-Yapa*
pp. 107-137(31)
Author: McConvell, Patrick

Link goes to Ingenta Table of contents for volume

Monday, March 13, 2006

Clendon, Reassessing Australia's Linguistic Prehistory

link goes to abstract.

Friday, March 10, 2006

Indigenous Languages and Culture Report

The Northern Territory Department of Employment, Education and Training (DEET) has released the Indigenous Languages and Culture Report, the culmination of a two-year review into Indigenous language and culture programs in Northern Territory schools.

In particular the review responded to the recommendations that Indigenous perspectives should be strengthened in all Northern Territory (NT) schools and high-quality curriculum material, providing an understanding of Australian Indigenous languages and culture, should be made available to schools.

Since the commencement of this review there has been an imperative set by the NT Government to have an increased focus on Indigenous languages and culture programs in DEET schools and ‘put bilingual education back on the agenda’ (Ministerial Statement, 24 August 2005).

The Indigenous Languages and Culture in NT Schools Review was tasked to deliver a document that:

* describes the continuum of Indigenous languages and culture activity in NT schools including a resource and funding index
* summarises the views of DEET personnel and school staff regarding access to, and appropriateness of, languages and culture resources
* provides findings and recommendations regarding future directions for the range of Indigenous languages and culture programs in NT schools
* provides findings and recommendations regarding future directions for the Two Way Learning program
* develops a draft NT government policy to guide the development and delivery of Indigenous languages and culture initiatives and programs in all NT schools.

The implementation of the recommendations of this report will ensure that all students in Northern Territory schools have access to relevant and high quality Indigenous languages and culture programs.

Indigenous Languages and Culture Report

The Northern Territory Department of Employment, Education and Training (DEET) has released the Indigenous Languages and Culture Report, the culmination of a two-year review into Indigenous language and culture programs in Northern Territory schools.

In particular the review responded to the recommendations that Indigenous perspectives should be strengthened in all Northern Territory (NT) schools and high-quality curriculum material, providing an understanding of Australian Indigenous languages and culture, should be made available to schools.

Since the commencement of this review there has been an imperative set by the NT Government to have an increased focus on Indigenous languages and culture programs in DEET schools and ‘put bilingual education back on the agenda’ (Ministerial Statement, 24 August 2005).

The Indigenous Languages and Culture in NT Schools Review was tasked to deliver a document that:

* describes the continuum of Indigenous languages and culture activity in NT schools including a resource and funding index
* summarises the views of DEET personnel and school staff regarding access to, and appropriateness of, languages and culture resources
* provides findings and recommendations regarding future directions for the range of Indigenous languages and culture programs in NT schools
* provides findings and recommendations regarding future directions for the Two Way Learning program
* develops a draft NT government policy to guide the development and delivery of Indigenous languages and culture initiatives and programs in all NT schools.

The implementation of the recommendations of this report will ensure that all students in Northern Territory schools have access to relevant and high quality Indigenous languages and culture programs.

Thursday, March 09, 2006

Strangers on our Shores: A Conference on Early Coastal Contacts with Australia

Saturday, March 04, 2006

Factors That Enhance Or Constrain Language Work By Indigenous Language Researchers.

Monday March 13th, 4.00-5.30pm

Room 3.03, Baldessin Precinct Building (Australian National University)

Josephine Caffery

Abstract

This paper explores the internal and external factors that enhance or constrain a trained indigenous language researcher in documenting or maintaining their traditional languages. The effectiveness of indigenous adult linguistic training on Australia’s endangered languages was assessed in remote and urban language communities across Northern Australia through interviews with case and focus groups and through surveys completed by linguists and language organisations associated with these language communities. This paper will discuss the number of indigenous linguistic graduates that use their skills to document and maintain their traditional language, and the types of language programs they work on after completing their training, as well as how effective these programs have been in their communities. The results of the research to-date show that not only do training issues affect the documentation and maintenance of Australia's endangered languages, but so do sociological, environmental and, more significantly, cultural issues. Linguistic organisations and registered training organisations may not be aware that these issues exist. Some of the issues cannot be addressed through training but can be addressed through language and linguistic organisations. Other issues are so embedded in culture that they may not be able to be changed in some language communities, but are important for other people to be aware of when working with these communities. The findings of this research provide an understanding of why people train in linguistics, the types of training they do and why they use or do not use these skills to maintain or document their endangered languages. The results will assist educators, curriculum developers and the wider education and linguistic industry in developing appropriate and effective training for those wanting to maintain or document endangered languages. The ultimate goal of this research project is for indigenous Australians to document more of their traditional languages before it is too late to do so.
SEMINAR PROGRAMME
Australian Journal of Linguistics
Clendon, Reassessing Australia's Linguistic Prehistory
Indigenous Languages and Culture Report
Indigenous Languages and Culture Report
Strangers on our Shores: A Conference on Early Coastal Contacts with Australia
Factors That Enhance Or Constrain Language Work By Indigenous Language Researchers.